English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exam – Set 169

Directions(1-10): In each of the following questions there are sentences. There is error in one of the parts. Mark the option which contains error parts as your answer. If no part contains error mark option E as your answer.

  1. (A) My strong, handsome, 5ft tall Geordie grandmother Thomasina travelled from Newcastle to Portsmouth in the 1920s on a coal boat, /(B) raised seven children and provided bed and board to merchant seamen as lodgers, /(C) constantly washing sheets with hand and torturing them with a mangle. Like many of her generation, she believed her reputation relied on keeping herself to herself and on how well her brass shone. /(D) Around 60, again, like many of her generation, she slipped into old age and died not long after.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    with = by

     

  2. (A) The pressure of hasty preparation for a no-deal outcome has added another layer of irritation. /(B) Annoyance on the revelation of spending more than £100m on ferry contracts to ease congestion at ports demonstrates the world of pain any no-deal scenario holds for the government. /(C) The Brexit menu, so decisively offered in 2016, has turned into a series of mushy dishes with various ingredients chucked in and fished out at the last moment. The optimistic case (from Number 10’s position) is that more pro-Leave MPs fear “losing” Brexit. /(D) Team May believes that parts of the hardline Eurosceptic bloc of up to 50 MPs have become less adamantine.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    on = over

     

  3. (A) This voluntary approach has been tried and tested with sugar and been found lacking. /(B) While there has been some progress in reducing sugar in foods, progress has been slow and too reliant on a handful of responsible manufacturer that want to do the right thing. /(C) The others know that, for now, there’s little penalty for failing to play along. /(D) This is in stark contrast to the impressive impact the fizzy-drinks tax quickly had on sugar levels in those drinks.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    manufacturer = manufacturers

     

  4. (A) Sometimes you can smell the stench of racism before you are actually upon it. /(B) As a child, I recall walking on the sands of one of Scotland’s most popular beaches and wondering why the whiff of human waste hung heavy in the air. /(C) A broken sewerage pipe on a grass verge held the answer. /(D) When you encounter racism in the raw or the utter absence of compassion at the plight of people fleeing death and torture it’s like looking into an open sewers.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    sewers -= sewer

     

  5. (A) For some reason, recent sightings of a largish castle and similarly showy palace, /(B) along with virtual tours around some of the eight homes accumulated by Prince Charles (estimated worth, £306m), /(C) have not inspired anything approaching the piano-related clamour. The reintroduction of Fergie and continued ascent of Camilla, fellow high-maintenance low-achievers, seem also to have left the piano’s detractors unmoved. /(D) Rather, the Queen, reliably the most astute and useful member of the royal family, courtesy of what must have been the least extravagant episode in an absurdly excessive royal year, finds herself selected for Twitter’s Christmas hate and thus a neat positioning device for any influencers keen to emphasise their own humility.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  6. (A) Age has never been experienced so differently – there are 60-year-olds who are chronically impeded and centenarians who remain very active. /(B) But any society attuned to the needs and rights of all its citizens has an imperative to address age discrimination, /(C) including ensuring at a basic level that the furniture of life is suitable for all ages and abilities. /(D) Age consciousness means, for instance, providing benches in city streets, rural transport and print large enough to read instructions.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    Age = Ageing

     

  7. (A) Theresa May’s slow-roast Brexit deal returns to the Commons next week for another stir of the pot. /(B) The withdrawal agreement has the whiff of something that has hung around too long to sharpen appetites. /(C) For all the bravado she has shown, she starts the new year with the same problem that haunted her premiership in the old one. /(D) The prime minister has shown her strength in withstanding Rocky Marciano levels of punishment – and still being there the next day.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  8. (A) This is fuelling a public health crisis. One in three children leaves primary school overweight or obese. /(B) We’re the most obese nation in western Europe, and the sixth fattest in the OECD, with obesity levels rising even faster than in the US. /(C) Obesity is associated with a lifetime of health complications, including type 2 diabetes and cancer – potential killers that are not only horrible to live in, but horribly expensive to treat. /(D) Obesity is second only to smoking as a cause of preventable deaths and costs the NHS more than £6.1bn a year.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    live in = live with

     

  9. (A) The refugee families, though, have begun to bring forth a new generation of Scots-Syrian babies and are opening businesses to stimulate the economy. /(B) Even some of those who sought to create a hostile environment for them have been won over. /(C) It seems that basic human interaction had revealed two inescapable truths: these people are no different from us and they have fled unspeakable horrors that few, /(D) if any, in even the most impoverished places in the west of Scotland, will ever encounter.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    had= has

     

  10. (A) Even the most fervent anti-conspiracist, aware of the risk of attributing skill or foresight to senior palace /(B) advisers and their associates (recall the Paul Burrell theft case, dismissed for lack of evidence, or the fatal neglect of Thomas Markle), /(C) may have wondered if mischief, as opposed to fathomless idiocy better explains the appearance of this eye-catching piece, /(D) so jarring with the Queen’s homiletic as to overturn, at least for some protesting on social media, her lifelong reputation for thrift.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     


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