English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exam – Set 171

Directions(1-10): In each of the following questions there are sentences. There is error in one of the parts. Mark the option which contains error parts as your answer. If no part contains error mark option E as your answer.

  1. (A) It’s been a while since Jeremy Clarkson caused an upset. /(B) The days of him punching a producer, prompting his ejection from the BBC, /(C) or straining diplomatic relations in Argentina seem too long ago, it’s enough to make one nostalgic. /(D) But order has been restored with a fresh storm about homophobic remarks aired during the new series of The Grand Tour, highlighted on Twitter by the singer Will Young.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    too = so

     

  2. (A) It has long been a challenge, particularly for those who are comfortable, /(B) to understand why anybody who is struggling would choose to be worse off. /(C) Liberals can take it particularly personally when those whose would most benefit materially from a change in policy or circumstance opt to reject it. /(D) The assumption is that they must be misinformed, ill-informed, uninformed, stupid, naive or cruelly misled.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    whose = who

     

  3. (A) Once the basics are covered, and one’s face is set against the storm, /(B) there is nothing like a good weather event to excite bipartisan unity. /(C) For a British person in the US, the advent of the polar vortex this week has been an embarrassment of riches the like of which we haven’t seen since first encountering the term “thundersnow”. /(D) It was -18C with wind-chill in New York this week – and, in a household in which my children persistently refuse to put on their coats, the weather finally won: on the school run we all went the full Shackleton.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  4. (A) It’s a long time since a speech needed to last for at least three hours to achieve greatness. /(B) The Gettysburg Address is famously only 272 words, and, at the normal broadcasting speech speed of three words a second, /(C) it would have taken Lincoln approximately a minute-and-a-half to deliver. But it hit a whole series of targets – /(D) the ambition of the founding fathers for equality and liberty, and the idea of a great national sacrifice to fulfil the ambition of “government by the people, of the people, for the people” – in the simplest and most direct language.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  5. (A) The Labour MP Harriet Harman has outlined her plan to end the biggest affront to human rights in the UK: /(B) indefinite immigration detention. As someone who spent over two years in detention, /(C) and who has campaigned against this inhumane practice since my release, /(D) you might think that this would come like welcome news.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    like = as

     

  6. (A) Politics and law are entirely different ways of seeing the world, even though they bump up against each other all of the time. /(B) The lawyerly mindset emphasises precision, takes the time to be certain, /(C) and makes sense of everything through the rules. To the average politician, lawyerly arguments are finickity, pedantic and beside the point, /(D) because when it comes to the crunch, politician will can sweep them out of the way.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    politician = political

     

  7. (A) It sounds like the job interview from hell. Olivia Bland ended up crying at the bus stop, /(B) after what the 22-year-old described as being deliberately torn to shreds over everything from her writing skills to her posture (apparently even “my arms were wrong, and the way I sat was wrong”). /(C) Tech company boss Craig Dean, the man on the other side of the desk, ended up posting /(D) what he called a “sleep-deprived and anxiety-driven” apology on Twitter after her account of it all went viral.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    described = describes

     

  8. (A) Will conspiracy theories dominate the European parliament elections in May? They’ve become worryingly rife, /(B) and liberal democrats are having a tough time countering them. /(C) Witness how swiftly the word spread on social media, soon amplified by far-right politicians in France, /(D) that the recent bilateral treaty signed in Aachen by Emmanuel Macron and Angela Merkel hid a sinister agenda: the selling out of Alsace-Lorraine to Germany, no less.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  9. (A) Since I started teaching part-time, my Friday mornings have begun to look remarkably different. /(B) Rather than waking up at 5:30am as I do during the rest of the week, I roll out off bed at a leisurely hour and often start my day with a yoga class. /(C) After enjoying the luxury of breakfast at my kitchen table instead of a classroom desk, I spend the rest of the day planning my year 10 lessons for the following week. /(D) Occasionally, I treat myself by popping out to the post office or the bank.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    roll out off = roll out of

     

  10. (A) Years of struggle has come to an end; finally, after a decade of taunting, my people’s time has come. /(B) It has not been easy, being mocked for the apps we inexplicably cannot get, /(C) and the Instagram pictures we post that look like they were taken by a drunk child, /(D) but now Android users have the upper hand.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    has = have

     


Related posts

Leave a Comment