English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exam – Set 174

Directions(1-10): In each of the following questions there are sentences. There is error in one of the parts. Mark the option which contains error parts as your answer. If no part contains error mark option E as your answer.

  1. (A) Heidi Allen, Anna Soubry and Sarah Wollaston are not the first MPs to break out from the Conservative party. /(B) The list of Tory resigners goes back to Winston Churchill in 1904 and beyond. /(C) And they are unlikely to be the last. Back in October I had a coffee at the Tory conference with a cabinet minister who confessed: /(D) “Part of me is longing for Boris Johnson or Jacob Rees-Mogg to become leader so the rest of us can just leave and join a new party.”
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    break out = break away

     

  2. (A) Last month I nominated Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, as a hate figure for the nation in 2019: /(B) the person we all need to get us from a difficult time, /(C) like your cousin’s girlfriend who waxes her eyebrows and yammers on about yoga at the start of a fraught Christmas. As I then explained about a million times on Twitter, I was joking: I do not hate Meghan, or even consider her vaguely hateful. I could no more despise the woman than/(D) I could flick through the pages of a magazine and take against a salt-and-pepper male model with a watch on.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    from -= through

     

  3. (A) Democracy abhors a vacuum. The realignment that is happening now in our politics /(B) is the inevitable consequence of 62% of the electorate feeling politically homeless. /(C) A majority of our people who felt that neither of our main /(D) parties share their values, principles and integrity.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    felt = feel

     

  4. (A) Except that history is nasty and ugly. It’s full of violence: every moment, every event, /(B) takes place within a power dynamic – there’s always a hierarchy in play. /(C) The whole concept of The Museum is a colonialist, imperialist fantasy, born from the fallacy that somehow the whole world can be neatly catalogued, /(D) contained in a single building, mapped out of easy digestion. There’s no such thing as a free object, and every piece in a museum has been moved from its original context. It’s uncomfortable and rude to look too closely at what that move involved.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    of = for

     

  5. (A) New York City’s new legal guidance on discrimination based on hairstyle is a thing of beauty. /(B) It points out that “there is a widespread and fundamentally racist belief that black hairstyles are not suited for formal settings, and may be unhygienic, messy, disruptive, /(C) or unkempt”, and deems natural hair textures that are tightly coiled or tightly curled, /(D) and black hairstyles such as locs, cornrows, braids, fades, and afros, a protected racial characteristic.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  6. (A) The first UK conviction for female genital mutilation (FGM) this month was a milestone /(B) in the fight for the basic human rights of women and girls. /(C) But one of the things that stands away from the news reports of that case is how oddly furtive they were about communicating the key facts – /(D) in particular their avoidance of the C-word: clitoris.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    stands away = stands out

     

  7. (A) Politics have always, to some extent, been the art of combining doing what’s right with doing what’s in one’s own political interests. /(B) It would be naive to pretend otherwise. But in recent months – with a weak prime minister desperately trying to cling on to power, /(C) and senior Tories hungrily eyeing the top job – /(D) it feels like naked political ambition is shaping real-world outcomes more than ever before.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    have = has

     

  8. (A) Until his death in the early 1990s, my grandad was a committed Nazi. /(B) Most of his elder brothers died in one night at the battle of the Hartmannsweilerkopf in the first world war. In a bitterly traumatised interwar Germany, defined by hatred against foreigners, /(C) Jews and democracy as well as delusions of national grandeur, he was unemployed for most of in 1920s. /(D) He joined the Nazi party early, and volunteered to fight in 1940. He became a staff sergeant in the Wehrmacht and led a so-called “anti-partisan” unit on the eastern front, and participated in the capture of Kiev.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    most of the 1920s

     

  9. (A) I’ve always thought of myself as someone who cares over the environment. /(B) I’ve recycled for as long as I can remember, I’m on my way to having a plastic-free kitchen and /(C) I always try to take public transport instead of driving. /(D) But until last year I was guilty of unknowingly contributing to 1m tonnes of waste a year, more carbon emissions than the shipping and aviation industries combined, and microplastics ending up in the ocean – just by buying new clothes.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    over = about

     

  10. (A) To help this movement win, we should ask why others lost. We should ask, for instance, why Occupy, /(B) despite the energy and sacrifices of so many, came to an end, while the institutions it confronted remain intact. /(C) We should wonder why the global justice movement of the late 1990s and early 2000s, despite the numbers involved, their courage and determination, has not changed the world. /(D) We should consider why Podemos, the Spanish party that rose so high on the optimism of the indignados movement, now seems to be spiralling into recriminatory collapse.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

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