English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exams – Set 156

Directions: In each of the following questions there are sentences. There is error in one of the parts. Mark the option which contains error parts as your answer. If no part contains error mark option E as your answer.

  1. (A) The French poetic tradition inclines to lines of a regular metrical length, usually linked with rhyme into couplets or /(B) stanzas. German poetry depends more on rhythm and stress, with /(C) repeated consonants (alliteration) to bind the phrases. /(D) Elegant or subtle rhymes have a courtly flavour.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    with = by

     

  2. (A) Piers the ploughman is one of a group of characters searching for Christian truth /(B) in the complex setting of a dream. Though mainly a spiritual quest, /(C) the work also has a political element. It contains sharply /(D) observed details of a corrupt and materialistic age.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  3. (A) A few years later Chaucer became one of the king’s esquires, with duties which include entertaining /(B) the court with stories and music. There can rarely have been a more inspired appointment. /(C) Chaucer’s poems are designed to be read aloud, /(D) in the first instance by himself.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    became = becomes

     

  4. (A) Chaucer’s first masterpiece is his subtle account of the wooing of Criseyde by Troilus, /(B) with the active encouragement of Criseyde’s uncle Pandarus. /(C) The tender joys of their love affair are followed by /(D) Criseyde’s betrayal and Troilus’s death in battle.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  5. (A) The pilgrims for the most part tell tales closely related to their station in life or to their personal character. /(B) Sometimes the anecdotes even reflect mutual animosities. /(C) The miller gives a scurrilously comic account of a carpenter being cuckolded. Everyone laughs heartily except the reeve, /(D) who began his career as a carpenter.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  6. (A) Edmund Spenser, who has the greatest lyric gift of any English poet in the two centuries /(B) since Chaucer, is a graduate of Cambridge and by inclination a humanist pedant. /(C) His inspiration comes largely from a desire to /(D) rivaling his classical and Renaissance predecessors.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    rivaling = rival

     

  7. (A) The theatres built in London in the quarter century from 1576 are a notable example of a contribution /(B) made by architecture to literature. In previous decades there have /(C) been performances of primitive and rumbustious English plays in the courtyards of various London inns, /(D) with the audience standing in the yard itself or on the open galleries around the yard giving on to the upper rooms.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  8. (A) Burbage gives his building the obvious name, so long as it is the only one /(B) of its kind. He calls it the Theatre. It follows the architectural form of an inn yard, with /(C) galleries enclosing a yard open to sky. /(D) At one end a stage projects beneath a pavilion-like roof.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    to the sky

     

  9. (A) The structure of the Globe and the other London theatres have a significant influence /(B) on English drama at its greatest period, because of the audiences which these /(C) buildings accomodate. Ordinary Londoners, the groundlings, stand in the open pit to /(D) watch plays for a penny. Others pay a second penny to climb to a hard seat in the upper gallery.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NEA
    Option A
    have =has

     

  10. (A) The year 1564 saw the birth of two poets, Marlowe and Shakespeare, /(B) who between them launch the English theatre into the three decades of its greatest glory. Marlowe /(C) makes his mark first, in a meteoric six years (from 1587) in which his life and /(D) his writings are equally dramatic.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    saw = sees

     


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