English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exams – Set 214

Directions(1-5): Given below are three statements, of which some may be incorrect. Identify the correct statement(s).

  1. I. It is easy to believe that above the board the scientific community is selflessly and single-handedly waging a war against disease, and its corollary, untimely death.
    II. It is easy to believe that across the board the scientific community is selflessly and single-handedly waging a war against disease, and its corollary, untimely death.
    III. It is easy to believe that on the drawing board the scientific community is selflessly and single-handedly waging a war against disease, and its corollary, untimely death.
    Only I
    Only II
    Only III
    Both II and II
    All of these
    Option B
    in sentence I, ‘above the board’ is an idiomatic expression that means without concealment.
    In sentence II, ‘across the board’ is an idiomatic expression that means applying to everyone.
    In sentence III, ‘on the drawing board’ is an idiomatic expression that means in the initial planning or design stage.

     

  2. I. Class, region and other social dimensions is important to explain the contraction and spread of different diseases.
    II. Class, region and other social dimensions are important to explain the contraction and spread of different diseases.
    III. Class, region and other social dimensions are important to explain the contraction and spread off different diseases.
    Only I
    Only II
    Only III
    Both I and II
    All of these
    Option B
    Sentence I is incorrect because of the usage of the verb ‘is’ as it violates subject-verb agreement.
    Sentence III is incorrect, as ‘off’ is a preposition that means so as to be removed or separated from. The sentence needs a preposition that would follow the noun ‘spread’ derived from a verb. Thus, ‘of’ is a better fit in this case.

     

  3. I. A significant number of infected poor and marginalised people do not necessarily report their condition to certified doctors.
    II. A significant number of infect poor and marginalise people do not necessarily report their condition to certified doctors.
    III. A significant number of infect poor and marginalise people do not necessarily report their condition to certify doctors.
    Only I
    Both II and III
    Only III
    Both I and II
    All of these
    Option A
    ‘Infect’ and ‘marginalize’ are verbs whereas the sentences need adjectives like ‘infected’ and ‘marginalised’ to describe the nouns following them.
    Hence, sentences II and III are incorrect while sentence I is correct. This makes option A the correct answer.

     

  4. I. The problem of malnutrition is known to facilitate an immuno-compromised condition, which in turn enhances the propensity for contracting of infections.
    II. The propensity to contract infections is enhanced by the problem of malnutrition as it facilitates an immune-compromised condition.
    III. An immune-compromised condition is facilitated by the issue of malnutrition and it often leads to increase in the tendency of catching infections.
    Only I
    Both II and III
    Only III
    Both I and II
    All of these
    Option E

     

  5. I. Seldom have I seen him going to the market after the breakdown of the pandemic.
    II. Seldom I have seen him going to the market after the outbreak of the pandemic.
    III. Seldom have I seen him going to the market after the outbreak of the pandemic.
    Only I
    Only III
    Only II
    Both I and II
    All of these
    Option B
    Sentence I uses the correct inversion. However, ‘breakdown’ is incorrect. Outbreak should be used in place of breakdown. Whenever we refer to a disease, a pandemic, an epidemic, we use the term ‘outbreak’.
    Sentence II is grammatically incorrect. ‘Have’ should be used before ‘I’.
    Sentence III is absolutely correct both grammatically and contextually.

     

  6. Directions(6-10) : Read the following sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as ‘No error’. Ignore the errors of punctuation if any.

  7. He had scarcely entered (1)/ on his duties than (2)/ the rebellion of June (3)/ broke out in Prague. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option B
    The error lies in the second part of the sentence. The word ‘than’ should be replaced by ‘when’.
    If hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are in the initial position, the subject and auxiliary are inverted:

     

  8. Up to now, Mrscott has sent (1)/ a great many request (2)/ for spare parts and other urgent (3)/ messages from one garage to the other. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option B
    The error lies in the second part of the sentence.
    The singular word ‘request’ should be replaced by ‘requests’. You use ‘a good many’ or ‘a great many’ to emphasize that you are referring to a large number of things or people.

     

  9. Maya, as well as her teachers (1)/ are associated in legend (2)/ with Dionysus and belong to (3)/the cycle of legends of Cybele. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option B
    The error lies in the second part if the sentence. The word ‘are’ should be replaced by ‘is’.
    When ‘as well as’, ‘along with’, ‘together with’, ‘No less than’, ‘In addition to’ and ‘Not’ and ‘with’ join two subjects, the verb will be according to the first subject.

     

  10. The number of acres of (1)/ forest land destroyed by (2)/ wildfires have increased dramatically (3)/ over the past several years. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option C
    The error lies in the third part of the sentence. The word ‘have’ should be replaced by ‘has’.
    The expression the number is followed by a singular verb while the expression a number is followed by a plural verb.

     

  11. Dr. Thompkins phoned the (1)/ fire brigade, whom then (2)/ alerted the management (3)/ and the ground staff. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option B
    The use of ‘whom’ is incorrect. ‘Whom’ should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. In the given the sentence, the pronoun should refer to the subject ‘fire brigade’, so we need to use ‘who’. So, the correct choice is B.

     


 

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