English: Phrase Replacement/ Sentence Improvement Set 110

Directions: In the given question, a part of the sentence is given in brackets. Below the sentence alternatives to the bracketed part are given at (A), (B), (C) and (D) which may help improve the sentence. Choose the correct alternative. In case the given sentence is correct, your answer is (E) i.e. No correction required.

  1. I don’t think you should (pass down) the opportunity to go to university.
    Pass up
    Pass through
    Pass over
    Pass on
    No correction required
    Option A
    The context of the sentence makes it clear that “you” is being advised either to accept or reject the opportunity to go to university. The most appropriate phrasal verb to depict this idea is “pass up”, which means to fail to take advantage of an opportunity.
    The meanings of the other phrasal verbs are:
    Pass down— to give something to someone who is younger, less important, or at a lower level than you.
    Pass through— a windowlike opening, as one for passing food or dishes between a kitchen and a dining area.
    Pass over— to ignore or to not give attention to someone or something.
    Pass on— to give something to someone, after someone else gave it to you

     

  2. There appears no civilised pale where they can remove their armour and (let on) their guard for any length of time.
    Let out
    Let past
    Let down
    Let off
    No correction required
    Option C
    The most appropriate phrasal verb in the given sentence is “let down”, as then only we can form the idiom “let down their guard”, which means to
    stop being cautious about potential trouble or danger.
    The meanings of the other phrasal verbs are:
    Let on— to reveal information.
    Let out— (of lessons at school, a meeting, or an entertainment) finish, so that those attending are able to leave.
    Let past—to allow one to pass by or around (someone or something).
    Let off— a chance to escape or avoid something, especially defeat.

     

  3. Rescuers had to (call by) the search because of worsening weather conditions.
    Call within
    Call for
    Call in
    Call off
    No correction required
    Option D
    The context of the sentence makes it clear that the rescuers had to either continue or stop the ongoing search because of worsening weather conditions. The most appropriate phrasal verb to depict this idea is “call off”, which means to cancel or abandon.
    The meanings of the other phrasal verbs are:
    Call by— to visit somewhere for a short while on your way to somewhere else.
    Call for— publicly ask for or demand.
    Call in— to phone a place in order to give or get information.

     

  4. He had expected everybody to (abide by) the rules he had applied to his own life.
    Abide for
    Abide so
    Abide with
    Abide off
    No correction required
    Option E
    The context of the sentence makes it clear that “he” wants everyone to follow the rules he had applied to his own life. The most appropriate phrasal verb to depict this idea is “abide by”, which means to follow a rule, decision, or instruction. None, of the given options are phrasal verbs. Hence, the correct answer is E.

     

  5. The downturn in the energy industry (dragged over) so long that workers drifted away and oil field equipment became outdated.
    Dragged by
    Dragged on
    Dragged through
    Dragged for
    No correction required
    Option B
    The most appropriate phrasal verb to depict this idea is “dragged on”, which means to continue for longer than you want or think is necessary.
    The meanings of the other phrasal verbs are:
    Dragged through—to test the fit of (a probable word, a segment of key, or another message) everywhere throughout a cipher-text.
    “Dragged over”, “dragged by” and “dragged for” are not phrasal verbs. Hence, the correct answer is B.

     

  6. If I had had enough money, I (had gone) to Japan.
    Would have gone
    Will have gone
    Would go
    Would had gone
    No correction required
    Option A
    The sentence is an example of third conditional sentences.
    Third conditional sentences are used to explain that present circumstances would be different if something different had happened in the past.
    When using the third conditional, we use the past perfect (i.e., had + past participle) in the if-clause. The modal auxiliary (would, could, should, etc.) + have + past participle in the main clause expresses the theoretical situation that could have happened.

     

  7. The number of people lined up for tickets (were four hundred).
    Have being four hundred
    Have been four hundred
    Are four hundred
    Was four hundred
    No correction required
    Option D
    The expression ‘the number’ has a singular meaning and requires a singular verb, whereas the expression ‘a number’ has a plural meaning and takes a plural verb.

     

  8. It is (stated often) that we use only 10 per cent of our brain.
    Often stated
    Oftenly stated
    Stated oftenly
    Often state
    No correction required
    Option A
    In the given sentence, the modifier ‘often’ has been incorrectly placed. ‘Often’ means frequently and should be placed immediately before the verb it modifies.

     

  9. The students (handed in) their papers to the invigilator and left the room.
    Handed on
    Handed across
    Handed of
    Handed for
    No correction required
    Option E
    The sentence is both grammatically and contextually correct.
    The phrase ‘hand in’ means ‘to submit something’.

     

  10. A comedian analyses the mundane from a variety of angles and (find the thread among two points).
    found the thread between two point
    finds the thread between two points
    finding the thread among two points
    is finding the thread among two point
    No correction required
    Option B
    The verb ‘find’ is not in agreement with the subject ‘A comedian’ which is singular in number. Besides, ‘for two points’ usage of ‘among’ is erroneous. Instead of ‘among’ ‘between’ must be used to make the sentence grammatically correct.

     

 

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