English Questions: Sentence Connectors Set 42

Direction: In the given question, a connector is given for the statements I, II and III. Choose the pair of sentences which can be combined using the given connector, when used in the beginning of the new sentence.

  1. Hardly
    I. Rostov handed him the letter and finished explaining Denisov’s case.
    II. The noise of the animals attracted little attention from the inhabitants.
    III. He heard hasty steps and the jingling of spurs on the stairs.
    I and II
    II and III
    I and III
    Both I and II & II and III
    None of these
    Option C
    ‘Hardly’ as an adverb means ‘scarcely (used to qualify a statement by saying that it is true to an insignificant degree)’.
    When a story is told in the past tense, the adverbial ‘hardly’ is often used to emphasize that one event quickly followed another.
    If ‘hardly’ is in the initial position, the subject and auxiliary are inverted. Also, ‘hardly’, it is always followed by ‘when’ or ‘before’ and not ‘than’.
    The sentence III should be connected with sentence I to convey that as soon as Rostov handed him the letter and finished explaining Denisov’s case, he heard hasty steps and the jingling of spurs on the stairs.
    The statement will be ‘Hardly had Rostov handed him the letter and finished explaining Denisov’s case, when hasty steps and the jingling of spurs were heard on the stairs’.

     

  2. While
    I. Researchers work in the daytime.
    II. We were waiting for the food to arrive
    III. We were happy to sit and chat in the relaxing surroundings.
    II and III
    I and II
    I and III
    Both I and III & I and II
    None of these
    Option A
    ‘While’ is used in the sentences to convey the meaning ‘during the time that; at the same time as’.
    Sentences II and III can be joined together using ‘while’ because the actions in both the sentences can happen at the same time i.e. a person can sit and chat in the relaxing surroundings along with waiting for the food to arrive.
    The statement will be ‘While waiting for the food to arrive, we were happy to sit and chat in the relaxing surroundings’.

     

  3. Despite
    I. He had monstrous habits of shredding anything in his path.
    II. He had a sense of honor more deeply ingrained than she’d ever suspected.
    III. The vigorous municipal life had fostered industry and commerce.
    Both I and II & II and III
    I and II
    I and III
    II and III
    None of these
    Option B
    ‘Despite’ means ‘without being affected by; in spite of’.
    Sentence I tells a habit of the subject while the sentence II mentions a completely opposite habit of him. Therefore, both I and II can be joined using ‘despite’ to form a contextually correct sentence.
    The correct sentence will be ‘Despite his monstrous habits of shredding anything in his path, he had a sense of honor more deeply ingrained than she’d ever suspected’.

     

  4. When
    I. She ran to the courtyard and slipped in through the back door.
    II. She enquired in a patronizing manner.
    III. She was close enough to the house.
    I and II
    II and III
    Both II and III & I and II
    I and III
    None of these
    Option D
    ‘When’ is used in the sentences to convey the meaning ‘after which; and just then (implying suddenness)’. In the given question, sentence III can be used as a main clause and sentence I can add the details by mentioning what happened when she was close to the house.
    Therefore, the correct sentence will be ‘When she was close enough to the house, she ran to the courtyard and slipped in through the back door’.

     

  5. Though
    I. Boris had contrived to remain at headquarters after the changes.
    II. Kutuzov had dismissed all unnecessary men from the staff.
    III. The whole idea gave him a headache.
    I and III
    II and III
    I and II
    Both I and II & II and III
    None of these
    Option C
    ‘Though’ is used in the sentences to convey the meaning ‘ despite the fact that; although’.
    The sentences I and II can be joined together using though to imply that Boris contrived to remain at headquarters after the changes even when Kutuzov had dismissed all unnecessary men from the staff.
    Therefore, the correct sentence will be ‘Though Kutuzov had dismissed all unnecessary men from the staff, Boris had contrived to remain at headquarters after the changes’.

     

  6. Barely
    I. I had set foot in the street.
    II. I realized I was lost.
    III. I saw a herd of elephants coming towards me.
    Both I and II & I and III
    I and II
    II and III
    I and III
    None of these
    Option A
    ‘Barely’ as an adverb means ‘only a very short time before’.
    If ‘barely’ is in the initial position, the subject and auxiliary are inverted. Also, ‘barely’, it is always followed by ‘when’ or ‘before’ and not ‘than’.
    Both the sentences II and III can be used after I to form contextually correct sentences.
    Therefore, the correct sentences will be ‘Barely had I set foot in the street when I realized I was lost’ and ‘Barely had I set foot in the street when I saw a herd of elephants coming towards me’.

     

  7. Since
    I. I am feeling excited for the Disney show.
    II. The restaurant is located at a beach resort.
    III. It is a good choice for hungry people who have just finished exploring the beach.
    I and II
    I and III
    Both I and III & II and III
    II and III
    None of these
    Option D
    ‘Since’ means ‘for the reason that; because’.
    The sentence II serves as the reason for sentence III.
    Therefore, the correct sentence will be ‘Since the restaurant is located at a beach resort, it is a good choice for hungry people who have just finished exploring the beach’.

     

  8. Rather than
    I. He played with the boys.
    II. He did not pay the taxi fare
    III. He walked home.
    II and III
    I and III
    Both I and III & II and III
    I and II
    None of these
    Option A
    ‘Rather than’ is used for saying that one thing is preferred to another or happens instead of another.
    Sentences II and III can be joined using ‘rather than’ to form grammatically and contextually correct sentence.
    The correct sentence will be ‘Rather than paying the taxi fare, he walked home’.

     

  9. Although
    I. His father was a king.
    II. Cyrus was brought up like the son of a common man.
    III. He lived simply and was at peace with all the world.
    I and II
    II and III
    I and III
    Both I and II & I and III
    None of these
    Option D
    ‘Although’ is used in the sentences to convey the meaning ‘in spite of the fact that; even though’. Both sentences II and III are in contrast with the the sentence I.
    Hence, the correct sentences will be ‘Although his father was a king, Cyrus was brought up like the son of a common man’ and ‘Although his father was a king, he lived simply and was at peace with all the world’.

     

  10. However
    I. Finding place for parking was next to impossible.
    II. When it came to Geometry and Algebra, it was different.
    III. Preparations were underway for the morning parade.
    I and II
    II and III
    I and III
    Both I and II & II and III
    None of these
    Option C
    ‘However’ is used in the sentences to convey the meaning ‘in whatever way; regardless of how’.
    The sentences I and III can be joined using ‘however’ to imply that it was difficult to find parking for the subject since preparations were underway for the morning parade.
    The correct sentence will be ‘However, finding place for parking was next to impossible, as preparations were underway for the morning parade’.

     

 

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