English Test for IBPS Clerk 2018 Main Exam Set – 25

Directions (1-10): Choose the odd sentence out of the given five sentences in each question.

  1. I’ve spent the past few weeks desperately sorting hundreds of pictures of Jo to archive, print off and put in albums.
    At first it was individual MPs being threatened with her name.
    My objective was to have finished the project by the new year so that the kids have access to as many pictures of their mum as they want
    Playing with them, dashing around on the campaign trail, on holiday together.
    Having spent way too long looking at pictures of her in the past few weeks, the thing that comes out in almost every photo is her spirit of generosity and kindness
    Option B
    ACDE

     

  2. One of the few comforts available to Brexit Britain is the thought that, no matter how dysfunctional we’ve become, at least we’re not Trump’s America.
    We may be crazy, reduced to organising fake traffic jams in a Kent airport,
    But I’m not sure our smugness on this score is justified.
    But at least we’re not in the third week of a government shutdown, caused by an unhinged president stamping his foot – and speaking of a “crisis of the soul” in a national TV address
    Just because his opponents refuse to fork out $5bn for a border wall to keep out migrants.
    Option C
    ABDE

     

  3. But those who verbally attacked and physically harassed us do not speak for ordinary leave voters or the disadvantaged.
    I’ve encountered them before; talking to people around the country is what I do.
    The Brexit result split those who support it.
    The darker politics that was mixed in with the mainstream leave vote no longer feels the need to hide.
    On Monday, Anna Soubry, Owen Jones and I were confronted by it.
    Option B
    CDEA

     

  4. “Voters are very sceptical about our warnings on the economy,” began his email.
    Just after midnight on 25 May 2016, a senior staffer in the remain campaign sent colleagues an urgent message.
    From David Cameron down, leading remainers considered the economy their trump card. In the biggest single choice Britain had had to make for four decades, they were sure economics would be the deciding factor.
    As head of strategy for Britain Stronger in Europe, Ryan Coetzee had bombarded Britons with evidence of the economic damage they would do to themselves if they didn’t stay in the EU.
    “They don’t trust the numbers. They don’t trust the Treasury.”
    Option C
    BAED

     

  5. Oxbridge vice-chancellors and admissions tutors prattle on about “widening access”.
    The Sutton Trust, an access charity, published statistics last month showing that eight elite schools send more students to Oxbridge each year than nearly 3,000 state schools and colleges.
    The schools include the £32,000-a-year Eton and Westminster.
    Access statistics and initiatives at Oxbridge have been stuck in a groove for two generations now, since the end of the old state grammar school system.
    By contrast, many of the 3,000 send not a single student to Oxbridge, year after year, and are concentrated in deprived and isolated communities like Rochdale, Sunderland and Weymouth, where Oxford and Cambridge may as well be Saturn and Mars.
    Option D
    BCEA

     

  6. Imagine that you could buy, in thousands of shops across the country, canisters containing toxic gas.
    Imagine that some people walked the streets, squirting this gas into the face of every child they passed.
    Imagine that it became a craze, so that a child couldn’t walk a metre without receiving a faceful.
    Imagine that, while a single dose was unlikely to cause serious harm, repeated doses damaged their hearts, lungs and brains, affecting their health, their intelligence and their life chances.
    If existing laws against poisoning children were deemed insufficient, new legislation would be rushed through parliament.
    Option E
    ABCD

     

  7. The “time has come when badges of honour make our shame glaring in their incongruous context of humiliation”, Tagore wrote in outrage as scores of peaceful protesters were massacred in Jallianwala Bagh.
    A century ago the eminent Bengali writer Rabindranath Tagore returned his knighthood to the viceroy of India.
    The belief that titles such as Officer, Dame Commander or Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire can be treated as purely symbolic, untainted by the gross brutalities of the imperial project, appear more plausible today, with historical distance.
    He would now “stand, shorn of all special distinctions, by the side of my countrymen”.
    In accepting the knighthood, Tagore had been unfairly accused of being a colonial flunkey, partly because he had expressed justifiable reservations about aspects of Indian nationalism.
    Option C
    BADE

     

  8. Michael Gove’s “public money for public goods” suggests a similar vision, though it is questionable how far it will survive trade negotiations, or whether he will be around long enough to be held to account for his warm, if slightly woolly, promises.
    These genuine custodians of the land would use fewer, if any, pesticides and be supported and protected from world markets with lower standards.
    A “leave‑backing former cabinet minister” recently stated: “We won’t be able to get certain foods like bananas or tomatoes but it’s not like we won’t be able to eat.
    When the sun is out, looking 10 years forward and given sensible, consistent leadership I can (just) imagine UK food, farming and wildlife thriving outside the EU.
    In that distant utopia we would be eating more local and seasonal food, more plants and fewer animals from smaller producers known by their customers and supported, not just for the food they produce, but for their care for soil, wildlife and livestock and the access they offer to the public.
    Option C
    DEBA

     

  9. Just when we thought we’d heard it all, along comes evidence of yet another way that men are controlling women, denying them bodily autonomy and sexually abusing them.
    It’s called reproductive coercion and, as a shocking new report in the journal BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Heath has found, as many as one in four women presenting at sexual health clinics is a victim of it.
    It describes a type of abuse in which someone else controls your reproductive choices.
    It’s one you might not have heard of; certainly it’s been little discussed and does not appear to have been highlighted by the #MeToo movement.
    Arguably though, it has a far more serious and potentially life-changing impact on women’s lives than many of the abuses that movement has documented.
    Option C
    ADEB

     

  10. In the era of Donald Trump and Xi Jinping, Britain’s engagement in Europe is freshly urgent.
    It shares enduring economic and cultural ties and values with the rest of Europe.
    Britain is a European nation by virtue of its geography and history.
    We took these positions on the basis of the same long-term principles.
    This newspaper supported Britain’s entry into the European Community in the 1970s. We opposed Britain’s departure from the European Union in 2016.
    Option A
    EDCB

     


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