English Test for IBPS Clerk 2018 Prelim Exam Set – 33

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follows.

There was a Brahmin called Haridatta who had a farm in a certain town. He was hard-working. But despite his hard work on his farm, his farm did not produce enough for him to prosper. One day, while working in the farm, he could not bear the heat anymore and decided to rest under the shade of a tree in his farm. Beside the tree, there was an anthill. While he was resting there, a cobra emerged from the anthill with his hood raised. Observing this, he thought, “This cobra must be the deity of the farm. From today, I will worship and offer oblations to the cobra. Perhaps, the cobra will bless the farm with a rich produce.” The Brahmin brought milk on a plate and offered it in front of the anthill and said, “I was not aware of your presence, O protector of my farm, please forgive me and accept my offering.”

As was the tradition, he went home after he made the offering. The next day, when he came to the anthill, he saw a gold coin on the plate he had offered milk in. He accepted the gold coin as a blessing from the cobra. This went on for a long time. Every day, the Brahmin would offer milk to the cobra and received a gold coin in the plate he offered the milk in. He started growing rich. After some time, the Brahmin needed to visit another village. In order that the worship of the cobra was not hampered, he instructed his son to offer milk to the cobra every day, and keep the blessing the cobra gives in return. Following his instructions, the Brahmin’s son did offer milk to the cobra in due time and went home. When he returned next day, he was astonished to find a gold coin lying in the plate. He thought, “If the cobra gives a gold coin every day, there must be lots of gold coins inside the anthill. I can take out all the gold coins if I kill the cobra.”

The next morning, instead of offering milk, the Brahmin’s son waited for the cobra to emerge from the anthill and hit the cobra with a stick in an attempt to kill him. The cobra fought back angrily as it was not a deadly blow, and bit the Brahmin’s son. He died from the poison, and his body was cremated in the very farm by their relatives. When the Brahmin returned, he heard what had happened and that his son had died. His relatives wanted to kill the cobra for revenge. The Brahmin was indeed aggrieved for his son’s death, but did not favour his behaviour that led to his death. He did not blame the cobra, and defended the cobra’s action.

  1. Which of the following is true about Haridatta?
    a. He has only one son.
    b. He offers milk to Cobra because of greed.
    c. He is a brahmin.

    Only a & b
    Only b & c
    Only c & a
    Only c
    All are Correct
    Option E

     

  2. What, according to the passage, is the most appropriate meaning of “anthill”:
    mound
    ditch
    depression
    dent
    None of these
    Option A

     

  3. What did the Cobra do in retaliation?
    a. he killed the boy.
    b. he offered a gold coin.
    c. he went inside the anthill.

    Only a & b
    Only b & c
    Only c & a
    Only a
    All are Correct
    Option D

     

  4. Why did the villagers wanted to revenge on the Cobra?
    it offered gold coin to the boy
    it made Haridatta a rich man
    it was the diety of the farm land
    Both a & b
    None of these
    Option E

     

  5. Why did the Brahmin instruct his son to offer milk to the cobra every day?
    the Brahmin doesn’t want to do it anymore on his own.
    the Brahmin was tired
    the Brahmin needed to visit another village
    All of these
    None of these
    Option C

     

  6. Directions(6-10): In each of the following questions there are sentences. There is error in one of the parts. Mark the option which contains error parts as your answer. If no part contains error mark option E as your answer.

  7. (A) The aspiration is particularly acute in the developing world, given the poor infrastructure and huge development financing needs. /(B) It is estimated that infrastructure investments needed in energy, transport, telecommunications, water and sanitation, education, and health projects will amount to more than 5% of gross domestic product (GDP) for developing countries. /(C) Meeting the financing gap needed for infrastructure services will be one of the biggest challenges in development. Unlike in the UK and the US, in developing economies, /(D) nearly 70% of the funding for infrastructure projects comes from the government budget, 20% from private players, and 10% from multilateral development banks.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    for = in

     

  8. (A) The inflation outlook and conditions in the financial markets has changed significantly since the last meeting of the monetary policy committee (MPC) /(B) of the Reserve Bank of India (RBI). Inflation has surprised on the downside and is expected to remain low in the coming months. /(C) This is partly because of lower-than-expected food inflation and a sharp decline in crude oil prices. /(D) The decline in crude prices has also extended the much-needed support to the currency market and helped the rupee recover from its recent lows. Consequently, the MPC, as widely expected, decided to leave the policy rate unchanged on Wednesday. It once again revised its inflation forecast downwards.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option A
    has = have

     

  9. (A) Unfortunately, the information flowing to the public deals with the symptoms, not the causes of the problem. /(B) The United Nations is focusing on the “emissions gap”, urging countries collectively to do more, /(C) skirting the key issue of who should do what, when and how. Researchers are more nuanced, acknowledging that India and /(D) China are doing more than their fair share, yet shying away from highlighting why the US and the EU are not doing more. NGOs are fixated on keeping the rise in global temperature limited to 1.5-2°C, ignoring that energy- and emissions-intensive infrastructure are essential for dealing with adverse effects.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  10. (A) There are two problems. First, is this loss-making for the utility? The average cost of supply is often ₹1-2 more. /(B) Related is the issue of Time of Day. Utilities often don’t have surplus capacity at the peak and without /(C) Time of Day, there is nothing to stop or at least disincentivize consumers from plugging in vehicles at the end of the day. /(D) Even if not today, the standards should move towards Time of Day pricing, which allow cheaper charging during grid surplus (off-peak) periods.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    which can allow

     

  11. (A) It is easy for social media to achieve behavioural change if the action is small and can be performed without /(B) leaving the comfort of one’s personal space. Social media is capable of getting someone to watch /(C) a video, or press the like button or make a small donation. The Ice Bucket Challenge social media campaign helped the /(D) Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) foundation collecting more than $100 million. In all these initiatives, the behaviour change is mostly being attempted at an individual level.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    collecting = collect

     


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