English: Word Usage Questions Set 53

Directions(1-9):In each of the following questions, a word has been used in sentences in THREE different ways. Choose the option corresponding to the sentences in which the usage of the word is CORRECT or APPROPRIATE.

  1. Despot
    (i) The crowd chanted “ Down with the despot.”
    (ii) The most important thing for us is the despot of our players.
    (iii) The despot has decided to control all television stations in his nation.
    Only (i)
    Only (iii)
    Both (i) and (ii)
    Both (i) and (iii)
    None of these
    Option D
    Despot : a brutal ruler who controls everything

     

  2. Bouquet
    (i) The Chief Guest was welcomed with a bouquet before the commencement of the cultural event.
    (ii) He was standing at the bouquet of the garden with a bunch of wild flowers.
    (iii) The bride carried a bouquet of red and white flowers.
    Only (i)
    Only (iii)
    Both (i) and (iii)
    Both (ii) and (iii)
    None of these
    Option C
    Only option ‘C’ is correct here.
    Bouquet means flowers picked and fastened together in a bunch.

     

  3. Camaraderie
    (i) Pakistan is not showing camaraderie after the revocation of Article 370.
    (ii) Bear Grylls spoke with easy camaraderie and cracked a few charmingly irreverent jokes which the Prime Minister politely ignored.
    (iii)Under the camaraderie’s orders, every firstborn child must serve in the military for a period of five years.
    Only (i)
    Only (iii)
    Both (i) and (ii)
    Both (i) and (iii)
    None of these
    Option C
    Camaraderie: friendly/ friendship/ solidarity/ fellowship
    In the last sentence the usage is not appropriate.

     

  4. Sagacious
    (i) Our sagacious ways will finally lead to our self- destruction
    (ii) The environmentalist gave a sagacious advice of not cutting down the trees at the slightest pretext.
    (iii) The sagacious article is full of errors, and does not belong in our journal.
    Only (i)
    Only (ii)
    Both (i) and (ii)
    Both (ii) and (iii)
    None of these
    Option B
    Sagacious: wise/ knowledgeable/intelligent
    The first and the third sentence are self- contradictory: a sagacious thing cannot be destructive and full of errors.

     

  5. Rampage
    (i) A man went on a stabbing rampage in Sydney killing a woman and wounding another before he was restrained by the police.
    (ii) The UN rights chief voiced concern about the various rampage in the recent past in US.
    (iii) The nationwide rampage aims to provide the students a sense of harmony.
    Only (i)
    Only (iii)
    Both (i) and (ii)
    Both (ii) and (iii)
    None of these
    Option C
    Rampage: riot/ rage
    Last Sentence is self-contradictory as rampage cannot bring harmony.

     

  6. Bear
    1) She bears a likeness to her grandmother.
    2) The criminals must bear full responsibility for the deaths of these innocent people.
    3) He was bearing a tray of brimming glasses.
    Only 1 & 2
    Only 2 & 3
    All 1, 2 & 3
    Only 1 & 3
    Only 2
    Option C
    The meanings of the word ‘bear’ as used in the above sentences are as follows:
    1) to have as a feature or characteristic
    2) to accept or allow oneself to be subjected to especially without giving way
    3) (of a person) carry

     

  7. Capital
    1) London used to be the financial capital of the world.
    2) She leaves her capital untouched in the bank and lives off the interest.
    3) Murder is the only capitalistic crime in the state.
    Only 1 & 3
    All 1, 2 & 3
    Only 2 & 3
    Only 1
    Only 1 & 2
    Option E
    The meanings of the word ‘bear’ as used in the above sentences are as follows:
    1) a city that is the center of government.
    2) wealth in the form of money or other assets owned by a person or organization or available for a purpose such as starting a company or
    investing.
    3) (of an offense or charge) liable to the death penalty.

    So, sentences 1 & 2 are correct according to the meanings provided above while the usage of the word ‘capital’ is wrong in sentence 3. Instead of ‘capitalistic’, the correct form of the word should be ‘capital’.

     

  8. Mock
    1) At times I went almost mad, talking gibberish, pulling faces, and singing in mock Latin.
    2) Today, I decided to mock a few stuck-up runners by effortlessly jumping over the track hurdles.
    3) He noted the latitude and longitude, then made a mock on the admiralty chart.
    Only 1
    Only 3
    Both 1 and 2
    Both 2 and 3
    All 1, 2 and 3
    Option C
    ‘Mock’ as an adjective means constituting a copy or imitation of something, as in sentence 1. ‘Mock’ as a verb means to imitate with mockery and derision. ‘Admiralty chart’ refers to the charts used by navy officers. You do not make a mock, you mock someone. Hence, the correct answer is C.

     

  9. Row
    1) Out in the bay, a small figure was rowed a rubber dinghy.
    2) They had a rowed and she stormed out of the house.
    3) Her villa stood in a row of similar ones.
    Only 1
    Only 2 & 3
    Only 2
    All 1, 2 & 3
    Only 3
    Option E
    The meanings of the word ‘row’ as used in the above sentences are as follows:
    1) propel (a boat) with oars
    2) a noisy acrimonious quarrel
    3) several people or things in a more or less straight line
    The use of ‘row’ in sentences 1 & 2 is incorrect. Only 3 is the correct sentence. Thus, option E is the correct answer.

     

 

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