English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exams – Set 225

Directions(1-10): Read the sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as ‘No error’. Ignore the errors of punctuation if any.

  1. It was a strange spectacle (1)/ to see the two former (2)/ enemies shaking hands and patting (3)/ every another on the back. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option D
    The error is in the fourth part of the sentence. The phrase ‘every another’ makes no sense in the sentence. It must be replaced with ‘each other’ to make the sentence correct.
    “Each other” is a reciprocal pronoun. “Each other” should be used to describe two individuals. Here, we are talking about two persons in the sentence so “every another” should be replaced by “each other” in the fourth part.

     

  2. The money she earned from each (1)/ of the trips across the (2)/ desert were devoted entirely (3)/ to paying off the loan. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option C
    The error is in the third part of the sentence.
    The words ‘each, every, either, neither’, used as pronouns or else adjectives, are always singular and require singular verbs. Therefore, ‘were’ must be replaced with ‘was’ to form a grammatically correct sentence.

     

  3. She methodically placed (1)/ the children’s magazine (2)/ on the table (3)/ besides the chair. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option D
    The error is in the fourth part of the sentence.
    The word ‘beside’ functions as a preposition and its most common definition is ‘at the side of; next to’ while the word ‘besides’ is defined as ‘in addition to, as well; moreover, furthermore’.
    Therefore, the correct sentence is: ‘She methodically placed the children’s magazine on the table beside the chair’.

     

  4. A traveller was walking (1)/ across a part (2)/ of Italy where a great many (3)/ sheep were pasturing. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option B
    The error is in the second part of the sentence.
    ‘Across’ indicates a movement from one side to another while ‘through’ is used to indicate movement in a three-dimensional space, with things on all the sides.
    Hence, ‘across’ must be replaced with ‘through’ to form a grammatically correct sentence.
    The correct sentence is: ‘A traveller was walking through a part of Italy where a great many sheep were pasturing’.

     

  5. You should prepare for (1)/ setbacks and breakdowns, and (2)/ you may had to take an (3)/ alternate route every once in a while. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option C
    Since auxiliary verbs are always followed by the first form of the verb as per the grammatical rule, ‘had’ will get replaced by ‘have’. Thus, option C is the most apt response.

     

  6. Tigers seldom or ever attack human (1)/ beings unless in self-defence, (2)/ and loss of life from (3)/ this cause has scarcely been reported. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option A
    The error is in the first part of the sentence.
    The correct phrase is ‘seldom or never’ and not ‘seldom or ever’.

     

  7. As the bed went passed them, the (1)/ doctors clasped their hands, head bowed (2)/ down and were seen praying for (3)/ the baby in a touching, respectful way. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option A
    “Passed” is the past participle of the verb to pass, meaning to move on or ahead; proceed.
    But there is already a verb “went” present. So, part (1) can be corrected by two ways. Either change ‘passed’ into ‘past’ which would make ‘went’ as the main verb with ‘past’ acting as the adverb, or remove ‘went’ and write ‘passed by them’. Hence, the correct answer is A.

     

  8. You just have to accept the fact that (1)/ some people aren’t meant to bring no (2)/ sense of happiness in your life and the only way (3)/ to be at peace is to get away from such people. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option B
    Part (2) is a negative clause. In a negative clause, if ‘no’ or ‘not’ is already present, there is no need to repeat it again. ‘Aren’t’ is an abbreviated form of ‘are not’. So, instead of ‘no sense’ it should be ‘any sense’. Hence, the correct answer is B.

     

  9. The company have also added (1)/ to its Daloonies range of (2)/ products for children (3)/ with a Filly Fritter character. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option A
    We need to replace ‘have’ with ‘has’. The subject company is singular, so, according to subject verb agreement rule, the auxiliary verb should be singular as well.
    So, the correct answer is option A.

     

  10. While the policy no doubt is (1)/ historic, many of its elements have (2)/ been recommended by (3)/ various committees for decades. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option E

     

 

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