English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exam – Set 168

Directions(1-10): In each of the following questions there are sentences. There is error in one of the parts. Mark the option which contains error parts as your answer. If no part contains error mark option E as your answer.

  1. (A) The most deserved losers are the Brexit ultras. They finally launched their leadership coup and failed miserably. /(B) Without a plausible plan or a credible leader, these are the men who put the ass into assassin. /(C) After all their prating about “taking back control”, they couldn’t even organise the removal of a mortally wounded prime minister. /(D) The Brexit fanatics have always been a minority of a minority and now no one be in any doubt about that.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    no one be = no one can be

     

  2. (A) As with laundry confessions, accounts of Impostor Syndrome are not, you notice, extracted /(B) from prodigious successful men (except for Tom Hanks); not even now, /(C) when research confirms that feelings of inadequacy can affect both sexes. Maybe, as with May’s tales from the spin-cycle, /(D) it would better advance sex equality if celebrated women held back from reinforcing the idea, promulgated since 1978, that this condition principally afflicts – not unlike period pains or the menopause – only half of the working population.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    prodigious = prodigiously

     

  3. (A) For Britain, the Brexiters have done the easy work of unsettling a nation. Both parts of Ireland, meanwhile, /(B) have been involved in the much harder business of settling a nation long torn apart by deep divisions of /(C) allegiance and aspiration. The great paradox of this moment is that /(D) the imperative of not endangering the fragile settlement on one island is profoundly unsettling for the other.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  4. (A) During the French Revolution, the population was divided into two groups. Active citizens, /(B) who were given limited voting rights, and passive citizens – women, /(C) the poor and former slaves – who were denied the vote. The constant drumbeat of criticism and insinuation levelled against black /(D) people in the public eye (and in this target-rich environment I am a very small fish) is designed to corral us towards a new form of passive citizenry.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    towards = into

     

  5. (A) It’s easy to see how this could extend to a wider male understanding of gender inequality in all areas of life. /(B) For instance, one man might look at the recent reports about cracksdown on sexist advertising and think: “Jeez, what’s all the fuss about?” /(C) The father of a young daughter, on the other hand, might feel very differently about billboards featuring /(D) a scantily clad young woman and an exhortation to fret about being “beach body ready”.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    cracksdown = crackdowns

     

  6. (A) The Brexit fanatics will still not vote for her deal. These political arsonists would rather torch their party /(B) and their country’s economy than compromise. Mrs May remains imprisoned by the parliamentary maths, /(C) her past mistakes and her lack of dexter. After all the to and fro between Westminster and European capitals, /(D) pinging from one side of the Channel to the other like a battered shuttlecock, there is no better prospect of her deal passing the Commons than there was on Monday when she swerved the vote.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option C
    dexter = dexterity

     

  7. (A) Once coined, the catchy, portmanteau label for female insecurity rapidly became as useful as you’d expect /(B) at a time when professionally successful women were unusual, often deeply unwelcome and regarded, /(C) unless they were teachers or nurses, as freaks. Clance and Imes were operating in an academic world not much advanced /(D) from the one described in Meg Wolitzer’s The Wife, where talented female students eagerly internalising the condescension of less able male contemporaries.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    internalising = internalise

     

  8. (A) On the morning of the referendum result in June 2016, the image that came into my head was that amazing trick that some /(B) people can do of whipping a tablecloth away while leaving all of the dishes and cutlery in a place. Except the trick was being tried by a drunk. /(C) The idea was that a whole layer of politics that had been there for 45 years – the EU – could be whipped away and yet all the others – government, /(D) parliament, the law, the union itself – would not be upset. It was never going to happen.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option B
    in a place = in place

     

  9. (A) The Benin bronzes have always been famous, partly because the works themselves are so exquisite and partly because their backstory is so brutal. /(B) The bronzes were not “acquired” – they were looted, taken from the royal palace of Benin during a “punitive expedition” of 1897 that also destroyed the palace and much of the ancient city. /(C) The bronzes – 4,500 plaques and statues that are in fact made from a brass alloy – /(D) were later auctioned off by the Admiralty to defray the costs of this punitive expedition.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option E

     

  10. (A) While many men miraculously manage not to be chauvinists all by themselves, for others a daughter could prove a wake-up call /(B) that is stronger, more visceral than any number of #MeToo campaigns. At which point, /(C) big and small inequalities that may have passed almost unnoticed regarding women they’ve known and even loved /(D) (mothers, sisters, friends) are thrown into unprecedented sharp focus. As I say, an education – that “man’s world” could start looking very differently when a father’s “mighty girl” has to navigate it.
    A
    B
    C
    D
    NE
    Option D
    differently = different

     


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