English: Error Spotting for Upcoming Exams – Set 224

Directions(1-5): In the given question, a sentence is divided into four parts. There are errors in three parts. Choose the part which doesn’t have an error. If all the four parts are correct, mark E, i.e. ‘All are correct’ as the answer.

  1. A miles further on we (A)/ turned abruptly of the highway (B)/ and the Range Rover sped into (C)/ the desert leaving landmarks ahead. (D)
    A
    B
    C
    D
    All are correct
    Option C
    A: “miles” is plural and “a” before it is a grammatical error. Since, we are talking about distances, it should be “a few miles”.
    B: it should be “off” instead of “of” so that the phrasal verb “turn off”, which means a road that leaves another road to go in a different direction.
    D: while travelling landmarks are left behind, not ahead.

     

  2. One hundred and fifteen acres for (A)/ hiking and cycling trails, along by fishing and kayaking (B)/ opportunities is available (C)/ at this outdoor attraction year-round. (D
    A
    B
    C
    D
    All are correct
    Option D
    Part A is incorrect because of the preposition ‘for’. ‘Of’ should be used instead.
    Part B is incorrect because of the preposition ‘by’ after ‘along’. ‘With’ should be used after ‘along’ to render the correct meaning.
    Part C is incorrect because subject-verb agreement is violated. When the connector ‘along with’ is used to combine two subjects, the verb agrees with the subject mentioned first. The subject in the sentence is hiking and cycling trails, which is plural, hence, verb must be plural i.e. ‘are’.

     

  3. Hardly had he crossed the road (A)/ than a stout gentleman in a beaver cap (B)/ came riding towards him in a handsome (C)/ ravenblack horse, accompanied with two hunt servants. (D)
    A
    B
    C
    D
    All are correct
    Option A
    Part B is incorrect because of ‘than’ after ‘hardly’. Hardly is always followed by ‘when’ or ‘before’ and not ‘than’.
    Part C is incorrect because of the preposition ‘in’. One always rides on a horse and not ‘in’ a horse. Therefore, ‘in’ must be replaced with ‘on’ to render the correct meaning.
    Part D is incorrect because of the preposition ‘with’ after ‘accompanied’. ‘Accompanied by’ is used when one thing is in the company of another thing while ‘accompanied with’ is used when one thing is in some way linked to another.

     

  4. After receiving a considerably (A)/ number of calls each day (B), the district attorney’s office have (C)/ decided to reopen an investigation. (D)
    A
    B
    C
    D
    All are correct
    Option B
    Part A requires an adjective while an adverb is used. ‘Considerably’ must be replaced with ‘considerable’ to render the correct meaning.
    Part C violates subject-verb agreement. Here the subject is ‘district attorney’s office’ which is singular and hence the verb must be singular. Therefore, ‘have’ must be replaced with ‘has’ to make it correct.
    Part D is incorrect because of incorrect determiner ‘an’. The sentence talks about a particular investigation, therefore, the definite article ‘the’ must be used instead of ‘an’.

     

  5. We could have (A)/ had the longer holiday, (B)/ if we didn’t spend so (C)/ many money on the house. (D)
    A
    B
    C
    D
    All are correct
    Option A
    Part B is incorrect due to wrong determiner ‘the’. It should be replaced with the article ‘a’ to make the segment correct.
    Part C is incorrect because of the incorrect usage of the tense. The sentence is a type 3 conditional sentence. In Type 3 sentences, the speaker looks back from the present to a past time and event. The speaker talks about what might have happened but did not, either because the wrong thing was done or because nothing was done. The main clause uses would, could, or might + have + the past participle of a main verb. The ‘if-clause’ uses the past perfect tense. Therefore, ‘didn’t spend’ must be replaced with ‘hadn’t spent’.
    Part D is incorrect because of the usage of ‘many’. We use much if the noun is non-countable (e.g., water, sand) and ‘many’ if the noun is countable (e.g., oranges, children). Therefore, ‘much’ must be used instead of ‘many’.

     

  6. Directions(6-10): Read the sentence to find out whether there is any error in it. The error, if any, will be in one part of the sentence. The number corresponding to that part will be your answer. If the given sentence is correct as it is, mark the answer as ‘No error’. Ignore the errors of punctuation if any.

  7. This textbook for graduate (1)/ and postgraduate students (2)/ covers the fundamentals of (3)/ high-temperature corrosion. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option E

     

  8. The founders of the school sought (1)/ to invest their doctrines with the halo of tradition (2)/ by ascribing them to Pythagoras and Plato, and (3)/ there is no reason to accuse them for insincerity. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option D
    In part 4, ‘for’ should be replaced with ‘of’ because the correct structure is ‘accuse someone of something’. There should be proper use of preposition.

     

  9. The woodman stirred the (1)/ fire until the flames did not leap (2)/ high and the sparks flew (3)/ out of the roof hole. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option B
    The error is in the second part of the sentence.
    Until meaning ‘up to (the point in time or the event mentioned)’ is a negative conjunction and no negative expression (for example: not) should be used with it.

     

  10. In India, the films in regional languages (1)/ don’t get the kind of reputation that they (2)/ would, which is truly tragic because there’s a (3)/ lot of cinematic magic floating around. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option C
    ‘Would’ means the action (get the kind of reputation) will be a completed action in future. But the statement is talking about a present situation. The sentence tells that the indie films should get recognition. It is a compulsion. So, it should be ‘should’ not ‘would’.

     

  11. While it is entertaining to watch Sahil and Vicky battle (1)/ it out in the beautifully lit nightclubs, (2)/ their fractured relationships with Rhea and Minaz (3)/ give the show any depth. (4)
    1
    2
    3
    4
    No error
    Option D
    ‘Any’ is used in negative sentences to show a little amount. The sentence is not a negative sentence. Moreover, the sentence also indicates that the relationship would add to the good things of the show. So, it should be more appropriate to use ‘some’ instead of ‘any’.

     

 

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