Mixed English Questions for upcoming Exam — Set 417

Directions(1-10): Below a word is given followed by three sentences that consist of that word. Identify the sentence/s which best expresses the meaning of the word. Choose Option E (None of these) if the word is not suitable in any of the sentences.

  1. MENDACIOUS
    A) As a politician, he was very adept at speaking mendaciously in public.
    B) Dogged and ingenious interrogation of a mendacious suspect finally reveals the truth.
    C) The form of government was borrowed largely from those prevailing in the mendacious orders.

    Both A and C are correct
    Both A and B are correct
    Both B and C are correct
    Only B is correct
    None of these
    Option B
    Sentence A)
    As a politician, he was very adept at speaking mendaciously in public.
    Here mendaciously is correctly used. ‘Mendacious’ means given to or characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth. Thus the sentence means that as a politician, he was expert in speaking lies in public.
    Sentence B)
    Dogged and ingenious interrogation of a mendacious suspect finally gets at the truth. Here mendacious is correctly used. ‘
    Mendacious’ means given to or characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth.
    Sentence C)
    The form of government was borrowed largely from those prevailing in the mendacious orders.
    Here the use of mendacious makes no sense. ‘Mendicant’ should be there in place of ‘Mendacious’. Mendicant here means of, relating to, belonging to, or constituting a religious order combining monastic life and outside religious activity and originally owning neither personal nor community property.

     

  2. PERSPICACIOUS
    A) What secured the nomination were two things: the movie’s extraordinary quality and the perspicacious marketing department at Netflix’s documentary division.
    B) The president began his Monday by scrutinizing his national security briefing, filling its margins with perspicacious questions and observations.
    C) Believing that poetry need not be as perspicacious as prose, he writes poems that are intentionally ambiguous.
    Only B is correct
    Both B and C are correct
    Both A and C are correct
    Only A is correct
    None of these
    Option D
    Sentence A)
    What secured the nomination were two things: the movie’s extraordinary quality and the perspicacious marketing department at Netflix’s documentary division.
    Here perspicacious is correctly used. Perspicacious means having a ready understanding of things/keenness in judgement.
    Sentence B)
    The president began his Monday by scrutinizing his national security briefing, filling its margins with perspicacious questions and observations.
    Here, the use of perspicacious makes no sense. ‘Perspicuous’ should be there in place of ‘Perspicacious’ . Perspicuous means plain to the understanding especially because of clarity and precision of presentation.
    Sentence C)
    Believing that poetry need not be as perspicacious as prose, he writes poems that are intentionally ambiguous.
    Here, the use of perspicacious makes no sense. ‘Perspicuous’ should be there in place of ‘Perspicacious’.
    Perspicuous means plain to the understanding especially because of clarity and precision of presentation.

     

  3. BRUIT
    A) The news of the impending marriage was bruited abroad.
    B) You should not resort to bruit force to solve a problem.
    C) A film that captures the thunderous fury of medieval warfare and the bruit of a thousand clashing swords.
    Both A and C are correct
    Only A is correct
    Only B is correct
    Both B and C are correct
    None of these
    Option A
    Sentence A)
    The news of the impending marriage was bruited abroad. Bruit is correctly used here. Bruit means to spread news about someone or something.
    Sentence B)
    You should not resort to bruit force to solve a problem. The use of Bruit here makes no sense. ‘Brute’ should be there in place of ‘Bruit’. Brute means not involving thought or reason.
    Sentence C)
    A film that captures the thunderous fury of medieval warfare and the bruit of a thousand clashing swords Bruit is correctly used here. ‘Bruit’ here means any of several generally abnormal sounds

     

  4. Magazine

    (A) He adlibbed a ridiculous story of wanting do a magazine piece on Shipton and began to flatter the listener, saying he was recommended as a prime source of accurate information.
    (B) There were five presbyteries holding magazine meetings and annual visitations of all the congregations within their bounds, and coming together in general synod four times a year.
    (C) The infantry and rifles are armed with small-bore magazine rifles, and the active artillery have steel breech-loaders with extreme ranges of 4150 to 4700 yds.

    Both A and B
    Both B and C
    Both C and A
    Only B
    None of these
    Option C
    The meanings of “magazine” are as follows
    a. a periodical publication containing articles and illustrations, often on a particular subject or aimed at a particular readership. (Noun)
    b. a container or detachable receptacle for holding a supply of cartridges to be fed automatically to the breech of a gun.(Noun)
    c. a store for arms, ammunition, and explosives for military use. (Noun)
    Among these, the meaning mentioned in (a) makes the sentence (A) meaningful. Similarly, the meaning mentioned in (b) makes sentence C correct. But the usage of the word ‘magazine’ in sentence B is incorrect.

     

  5. MYSTIQUE
    A) John of the Cross Carmelite friar and priest of converso origin, is a major figure of the Spanish Counter-Reformation, a
    mystique and Roman Catholic saint.
    B) As an artist committed to the mystique , Bowie doesn’t share much about their upbringing.
    C) Cold and white, this Midwestern state plays a unique role in the mystique of presidential campaigns.
    Both A and B are correct
    Both B and C are correct
    Both A and C are correct
    Only C is correct
    None of these
    Option B
    Sentence A)
    John of the Cross Carmelite friar and priest of converso origin, is a major figure of the Spanish Counter-Reformation, a
    mystique and Roman Catholic saint.
    Here use of mystique makes no sense.
    ‘Mystic’ should be there in place of ‘Mystique’. Mystic here means a person who believes in the spiritual apprehension of truths that are beyond the intellect.
    Sentence B)
    As an artist committed to the mystique , Bowie doesn’t share much about their upbringing.
    Here mystique is correctly used.
    ‘Mystique’ means an air or attitude of mystery and reverence developing around something or someone
    Sentence C)
    Cold and white, this Midwestern state plays a unique role in the mystique of presidential campaigns
    Here mystique is correctly used.
    ‘Mystique’ means the special esoteric skill essential in a calling or activity

     

  6. INVECTIVE
    A. He had expected criticism but not the invective that greeted his proposal.
    B. This half measure was as invective as was to have been expected.
    C. The syllogism is invective , belonging to argumentation, and constraining assent where what we want is control of things.
    Both A and B
    Both B and C
    Only A
    Both A and C
    None of these
    Option C
    The word ‘invective’ means ‘abusive language used to express blame or ill will’.
    In sentence A, the word has been used correctly. The sentence suggests that ‘he had expected criticism but not the abusive language that greeted his proposal’.
    In sentence B, the word has been used incorrectly. ‘Half measure’ cannot be regarded as ‘invective’.
    In sentence C, the word has been used incorrectly. A syllogism cannot be ‘invective’.

     

  7. MERCURIAL
    A. Indeed, anyone who does not master this mercurial context will be mastered by it.
    B. Nations are possessed with an insane ambition to mercurial the memory of themselves by the amount of hammered stone they leave.
    C. The tournament is open to both amateurs and mercurials.
    Only C
    Both B and C
    Both A and B
    Only A
    None of these
    Option D
    ‘Mercurial’ means ‘capricious’ or ‘liable to sudden unpredictable change’ or ‘ quick and changeable in temperament’.
    In sentence A, the word has been used correctly.
    The sentence suggests that ‘indeed, anyone who does not master this capricious context will be mastered by it’.
    In sentence B, the word has been used incorrectly. It does not fit the sentence grammatically and is therefore incorrect.
    ‘perpetuate’ should be there in place of ‘mercurial’
    ‘perpetuate’ means make (something) continue indefinitely.
    In sentence C, the word has been used incorrectly. ‘Amateurs’ and ‘capricious’ do not go together. The sentence does not make any sense. ‘amateurs’ means a person who is incompetent or inept at a particular activity. ‘pros’ should be there in place of ‘mercurials’. ‘pro’ is a shortening of ‘ professional’, especially in sports.

     

  8. BUSK
    A) The playwright, who is currently busking in the success of his hit Broadway play is already planning to work on a new musical adaptation of next year.
    B) John spent the next ten years just busking around.
    C) Kennedy, a former busker, leads the midweek albums chart, with the Beatles’ classic album dropping to No. 2.
    Both B and C are correct
    Both A and C are correct
    Both A and B are correct
    All are correct
    None of these
    Option A
    Sentence A)
    The playwright, who is currently busking in the success of his hit Broadway play is already planning to work on a new musical adaptation of next year.
    The use of busking here makes no sense. ‘Basking’ should be there in place of ‘Busking’. Basking means to take pleasure or derive enjoyment.
    Sentence B)
    John spent the next ten years just busking around.
    Busking is correctly used here.
    Busking means to play music or sing in a public place so that the people who are there will give money.
    Sentence C)
    Kennedy, a former busker , leads the midweek albums chart, with the Beatles’ classic album dropping to No. 2.
    Busking is correctly used here.
    Busking means to play music or sing in a public place so that the people who are there will give money.

     

  9. EERIE
    A) Signing Charles Woodson The similarities between the franchise signing White and Charles Woodson are eerie , although Woodson signed with far less fanfare.
    B) The eerie quiet that followed amplified the ringing of her ears.
    C) The Eagle cast an envious eye on the Russian supply centre near the village of Kalantut, some ten miles from his Paghman
    eerie.
    Both A and C are correct
    Both B and C are correct
    Both A and B are correct
    Only A is correct
    None of these
    Option C
    Sentence A)
    Signing Charles Woodson The similarities between the franchise signing White and Charles Woodson are eerie , although Woodson signed with far less fanfare.
    Here eerie is correctly used.
    Eerie here refers to the strange similarity between the franchise signing White and Charles Woodson
    Sentence B)
    The eerie quiet that followed amplified the ringing of her ears.
    Eerie here refers to the strange silence
    Sentence C)
    The Eagle cast an envious eye on the Russian supply centre near the village of Kalantut, some ten miles from his Paghman
    eerie. Eerie is wrongly used here.
    ‘Eyrie’ should be there in place of ‘Eerie’. Eyrie means the nest of an eagle or other bird of prey, built in a high inaccessible place.
    The correct sentence is:
    ‘The Eagle cast an envious eye on the Russian supply centre near the village of Kalantut, some ten miles from his Paghman
    eyrie.’

     

  10. MINE
    A. While musicians, jugglers, mine artists and an occasional fire-eater provide the entertainment, the sun sinks slowly below the horizon.
    B. The mine’s like a thousand other holes in the ground—it’s outlived its time.
    C. So I say the horses and chickens are mine and Alex says the other animals are his.
    Both A and B
    Only B
    Only C
    Both B and C
    None of these
    Option D
    The word mine carries several meanings:
    1. As a pronoun it is used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with the speaker.
    2. As a noun it means an excavation in the earth for extracting coal or other minerals.
    3. As a verb it means to obtain (coal or other minerals) from a mine.

    Among these, the meaning given in 1 makes statement C correct . the meaning in 2 makes statement B correct .But it has been incorrectly used in statement A. the correct word here should be ‘mime’ which means the theatrical technique of suggesting action, character, or emotion without words, using only gesture, expression, and movement.

     

Related posts