English: Sentence Fillers — Set 62 (IBPS PO 2017 Pattern)

Directions(1-10): In each question, a sentence is given followed by a blank. Each blank is followed by three options and you have to determine which option can be used in place of blank to make it a meaningful sentence and mark it as your answer.

  1. One day in September 1915, Cecil Chubb attended an auction at the New Theatre, Salisbury, hoping to ______________ a pair of curtains. Hours later, the barrister emerged having bought Stonehenge for £6,600, which is £474,000 in today’s money but still quite a snip. He gave it to his wife, Mary, as a birthday present. Three years later, the Chubbs surrendered the prehistoric monument to public ownership.
    a. inform of
    b. pick up
    c. take up

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only b
    All are Correct
    Option B

     

  2. The Labour movement was founded to represent the interests of the organised working class. Brexit is ______________ to be the greatest disaster for working-class Britain since Thatcherism, albeit a disaster that large numbers of working-class voters wished on themselves.
    a. ameliorating
    b. taking form
    c. shaping up

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only c
    All are Correct
    Option E

     

  3. Cable, a contestant on the 2010 Strictly Come Dancing Christmas special, said: “As British society ______________ , it could pose a risk to Strictly… If we have a cack-handed immigration policy like we have for non-EU citizens, all kinds of perverse decisions could be made.”
    a. falls apart
    b. comes together
    c. breaks down

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only b
    All are Correct
    Option C

     

  4. The Treasury originally had 31 October in the diary for the budget until it was ______________ to the chancellor that this was begging to be greeted with headlines about “Hammond’s Halloween Frighteners”. His physical resemblance to a not-so-distant cousin of the Addams Family would have made it just too tempting for the media to resist.
    a. brought up
    b. pointed out
    c. touched on

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only b
    All are Correct
    Option A

     

  5. Mrs May has yet to define exactly what she meant. Does ending austerity imply a reversal of all the cuts to public spending implemented since the deficit-reduction programme began in 2010? That’s not going to happen. Even Labour, which rarely blushes to make massive spending commitments under its current management, is not promising that it could ______________ like that.
    a. recreate the time
    b. turn the clock back
    c. be the way of life

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only c
    All are Correct
    Option A

     

  6. Austerity is not ending at all, they will cry. And with some justice. John McDonnell, the shadow chancellor, will already have written that passage of Jeremy Corbyn’s budget day riposte on behalf of the opposition. The prime minister’s pledge has also encouraged Tory backbenchers and spending ministers to ______________ their demands for more money for electorally sensitive areas. The clamour is for more funds for policing, schools and the armed forces.
    a. draw up
    b. ramp up
    c. build up

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only a
    All are Correct
    Option B

     

  7. A deal of some kind, even a pretty rotten one, might lift some of the Brexit blight that has haunted Britain’s economy for the past 28 months. The chancellor likes to tell anyone who will listen about his “wall of money” theory: the ______________ cash that he believes will be invested by business and boost growth if Britain leaves the EU with a tolerable arrangement with its former partners.
    a. bottled-up
    b. rap-up
    c. pent-up

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only a
    All are Correct
    Option C

     

  8. Cable’s core point was sound – the general situation for all EU residents in the UK could be viewed as anything from unresolved to calamitous. When it comes to the entertainment industry, the Musicians’ Union, dance companies and other arts organisations have ______________ the government to protect the free movement of performers.
    a. appealed to
    b. called upon
    c. bumbled to

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only c
    All are Correct
    Option A

     

  9. Even if you concede that their descriptions are accurate, the questions ______________ . Do they think Brexit will remove the causes of the anger? No. So where will the anger turn once we are out? They don’t know. Do they believe their constituents can avoid cuts to income and public services after Brexit? Of course not. When they say your voters have nothing left to lose, are they sure about that? No, there’s always more to lose.
    a. stack up
    b. pile up
    c. heap up

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only a
    All are Correct
    Option E

     

  10. By 1993, Stonehenge was described as a “national disgrace” by MPs – even though it had become a Unesco world heritage site only seven years earlier. The Commons public accounts committee agreed, describing the car park as “inadequate” and its visitor facilities as squalid, but still the government declined to ______________ the millions of pounds needed to improve the site.
    a. pony up
    b. boonk up
    c. plank out

    Both a & b
    Both b & c
    Both c & a
    Only c
    All are Correct
    Option C

     


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