Mixed English Questions for Mains Exam — Set 258

Directions (1-5): In each question given below a sentence is given and is divided into three parts. For each part a correction statement is also given(I,II and III). You have to determine which part requires correction and mark it as your answer.

  1. India’s second mission to the moon was planned for July 15, but / got delayed owe to technical problems just one hour before the actual launch. However, ISRO scientists identified the anomaly quickly and now, / within a week, the Chandrayaan 2 mission has begun its journey towards the moon.

    I. India’s second mission to the moon was planned for July 15, if
    II. got delayed owing to technical problems just one hour before the actual launch. However, ISRO scientists identified the anomaly quickly and now,
    III. within a week, the Chandrayaan 2 mission has begun their journey towards the moon.

    Both I & II
    Both II & III
    Both III & I
    Only II
    None of these
    Option D

     

  2. The launch of the mission on July 22, is a successfully first step / towards realising a larger aim of the mission, which is to ensure that / India’s lander successfully makes a soft landing on the surface of the moon.

    I. The launch of the mission on July 22, is a successful first step
    II. towards realising a large aim of the mission, which is to ensure that
    III. India’s lander successfully makes a soft land on the surface of the moon.

    Both I & II
    Both II & III
    Both III & I
    Only I
    None of these
    Option D

     

  3. After the successful launch of Chandrayaan 2, now the wait is for the soft landing on the moon on September 6. / For the next one-and-a-half month, / ISRO scientists would be required to ensure that the mission remains in good health.

    I. After the success launch of Chandrayaan 2, now the wait is for the soft landing on the moon on September 6.
    II. For the next one-and-a-half months
    III. ISRO scientists would be required to ensure that the mission remain in good health.

    Both I & II
    Both II & III
    Both III & I
    Only II
    None of these
    Option D

     

  4. We love hearing our country is described as an engine of global growth. Of course, / all growth does matters for cumulative global growth. But does India really qualify to be / described as a locomotive of global growth? India’s 2017 GDP was $2,439 billion at market exchange rates.

    I. We love to hear our country being described as an engine of global growth. Of course,
    II. all growth matters for cumulative global growth. But does India really qualify to be
    III. described like a locomotive of global growth? India’s 2017 GDP was $2,439 billion at market exchange rates.

    Both I & II
    Both II & III
    Both III & I
    Only II
    None of these
    Option A

     

  5. Chandrayaan 2 has been one of the most awaited mission of ISRO. / After the successfully of Chandrayaan 1 in 2008, it was expected that the second mission would get moon-bound shortly. / In fact, ISRO did plan the second mission for 2014. However, this was supposed to be a joint mission along with Russia.

    I. Chandrayaan 2 has been one of the most awaited missions of ISRO
    II. After the success of Chandrayaan 1 in 2008, it was expected that the second mission would get moon-bound shortly.
    III. In fact, ISRO did plan the second mission for 2014. However, this was suppose to been a joint mission along with Russia.

    Both I & II
    Both II & III
    Both III & I
    Only II
    None of these
    Option A

     

  6. Directions (6-10): In each of the following questions a short passage is given with one of the lines in the passage missing and represented by a blank. Select the best out of the five answer choices given, to make the passage complete and coherent (coherent means logically complete and sound).

  7. When Chandrayaan 2 arrives at the moon in a few weeks from now, it will seek to soft-land the lunar module, Vikram with its rover, Pragyan, on a site between two large craters in the south polar region. India is not the only one interested in the moon’s south pole. Other countries as well as private corporations are aiming at the same area; for a good reason — the lunar south pole has places where the sun never sets ………………………
    These places are called “Peaks of Eternal Light”— points on any celestial body that receive sunlight through the year.
    The moon has these peaks on its polar regions.
    Near permanent sunlight facilitates the establishment of lunar stations with assured supply of solar energy.
    There are barely any peaks that have “eternal” or permanent illumination.
    The peaks in the south polar region are considered more attractive than those in the north.
    Option A

     

  8. Water can also be broken down into hydrogen and oxygen, which in turn can be turned into rocket fuel. With moon’s low gravity, space vehicles need a lot less fuel than on earth for take-off. That could make the moon a convenient way-station from which human explorers could travel to other celestial bodies …………………….
    China hopes to build a lunar robotic station near the south pole in little more than a decade.
    Mars is already in the sights of many space-faring nations.
    In January this year, China’s Chang’e 4 soft-landed in the Von Karman crater on the dark side of the south polar region.
    The US lunar programme, revived by the Trump Administration, now aims to put man back on the moon in the next decade.
    Right now, the moon rush on the earth is aimed at the lunar south pole.
    Option B

     

  9. …………………………………………. Business is instead moving to digital-native insurers, many of which are offering low premiums to those willing to collect and share their data. Yet the biggest winners could be tech companies rather than the firms that now dominate the industry. Insurance is increasingly reliant on the use of technology to change behaviour; firms act as helicopter parents to policyholders, warning of impending harm—slow down; reduce your sugar intake; call the plumber—the better to reduce unnecessary payouts. Yet this sort of relationship relies on trust, and the Googles and Apples of the world, on which consumers rely day-by-day and hour-by-hour, may be best placed to win this business.
    The growing mountain of personal data available to individuals and, crucially, to firms is giving those with the necessary processing power the ability to distinguish between low-risk and high-risk individuals.
    Cheap sensors and the tsunami of data they generate can improve our lives; blackboxes in cars can tell us how to drive more carefully and wearable devices will nudge us toward healthier lifestyles.
    The better behaviour resulting from smart devices is just one threat to the insurance industry. Conventional risk pools (for home or car insurance, for example) are shrinking as preventable accidents decline, leaving the slow-footed giants of the industry at risk.
    The uncertainty that underpins the need for insurance is now shrinking thanks to better insights into individual risks.
    The data has enabled insurance companies to gauge the situation and plan accordingly.
    Option C

     

  10. As a lunar race unfolds, the world will run, sooner than later, into difficult problems about such mundane issues as property rights. The international law of outer space is now defined by the 1967 Outer Space Treaty. ………………………. It calls the exploration and use of outer space “shall be the province of all mankind”.
    Like so much in law, one principle often contradicts another.
    The interpretation of these principles is becoming contentious as the world’s space-faring nations come to terms three important facts.
    The OST is quite explicit in affirming that outer space and celestial bodies like the moon can’t be “appropriated” by any nation through claims of sovereignty, occupation or any other means.
    There is also contention on another question — who owns the resources of the moon?
    That inevitably takes us out of the legal and into the political domain.
    Option C

     

  11. …………………………………….. Amidst the growing scale and scope of humanity’s lunar adventure, the Foreign Office needs to take up international space cooperation as a strategic priority. It also needs to develop a stronger political voice for India in shaping new rules for the moon and outer space.
    Tiny Luxembourg has passed a similar law to attract companies interested in space mining.
    Quite clearly, this is a recipe for competition and conflict on the moon.
    The OST certainly exhorts states to cooperate and extend mutual assistance to each other in outer space.
    As India celebrates the successful launch of Chandrayaan 2, Delhi needs to match the extraordinary success of its scientists with sustained diplomatic effort at the highest level.
    Like so much in law, one principle often contradicts another.
    Option D

     

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